Lina Bo Bardi Giancarlo Palanti Studio d’Arte Palma 1948 – 1951
Nilufar Depot apr18-5721 copy




As an architect, designer, scenographer, editor, writer and illustrator, Lina Bo Bardi was a woman of almost unlimited talent whose vision of design was in equal measures generous and uncompromising.

After graduating in architecture in Italy during WWII, Lina joined the resistance, an experience that profoundly shaped her understanding of architecture as a political and social endeavour.
Later on, in Brazil, this sensibility matured and became the inspiration for sharp texts, open environments and extraordinary buildings.

Integrating architecture with the design of furniture, interiors, and often curating the programme of her public buildings, Lina aimed at producing common meanings and creating a bond between people and space. She pursued such ambition by mastering craft and fabrication processes in order to make apparent the natural and local qualities of the materials and cultures she worked with. Collaborations with people from diverse fields of interest were crucial to construct an extensive and shared body of knowledge. This is the case of Italian architect Giancarlo Palanti, with whom she founded the Estúdio de Arte e Arquitetura Palma, which designed and produced several furniture pieces.

Focusing especially on the work realised within the Estúdio Palma, the exhibition by Nilufar Gallery, designed by Space Caviar, presents the largest collection of Lina’s furniture ever brought together. Many of the pieces displayed, mostly chairs and armchairs, are rare objects originating in Brazil. The unique combination of iconic and everyday in her furniture, each piece built for a specific purpose, is a powerful expression of Lina Bo Bardi’s generous and all-encompassing philosophy of design.

http://bobardi-palanti.com/

Focusing especially on the work realised within the Estúdio Palma, the exhibition by Nilufar Gallery, designed by Space Caviar, presents the largest collection of Lina’s furniture ever brought together. Many of the pieces displayed, mostly chairs and armchairs, are rare objects originating in Brazil. The unique combination of iconic and everyday in her furniture, each piece built for a specific purpose, is a powerful expression of Lina Bo Bardi’s generous and all-encompassing philosophy of design.

http://bobardi-palanti.com/

Curated by
Nina Yashar

With the support of
Instituto Bardi | Casa de Vidro

Exhibition Design:
Space Caviar
- Joseph Grima, Sofia Pia Belenky

Creative Direction:
Studio Vedèt
- Valentina Ciuffi, Georgia Cranstoun, Nunzio Mazzaferro

Photography : Amendolagine Barracchia

Special Thanks:
Dedar Milano
Duggal Visual Solutions
Janet Yonaty Inc.
Nelson Kon
Instituto Bardi | Casa de Vidro

Exhibitions:
16/04 2018 – 08/03 2019
Nilufar Depot
Viale Lancetti 34 Milano

Press:
Wallpaper*
W Magazine
New York Times

Permalink
Kolenspoor City

KC Press Img 1_ Space Caviar_preview

An imaginary future town created with paper and pencils, around a 70km coal-track of central Limburg (BE).

An experimental collaboration in urban design, during 25 workshops along 6 municipalities, with 300 citizens.

Kolenspoor City project is a temporary independent social framework where any citizen of the Limbourg region can actively play a role while re-imagining step by step the existing geographies, infrastructures, economies and activities of their lands.

The project uses the Incomplete City workshop which makes use of simple tools like paper, pencils, scissors and a copy machine, and leads to the creation of complex city systems that start from simple city elements. In Kolenspoor City project this format was applied, extended and localised as an engaging game in the Limbuorg region along the coal track — kolenspoor.

The resulting six municipality cityscapes were consequently joint in a final open workshop where combining elements and clusters, a visual image of the near future Kolenspoor City was created.

KOLENSPOOR CITY ATLAS:
During the Kolenspoor City Workshops, an atlas of elements was created. Elements include everything one would need to construct their own vision of the city: architecture, cows, trees, infrastructure, people etc. For more information on this 600 page ATLAS or to purchase visit: Kolenspoor City ATLAS.

An imaginary future town created with paper and pencils, around a 70km coal-track of central Limburg (BE). An experimental collaboration in urban design, during 25 workshops along 6 municipalities, with 300 citizens.

For more information visit : www.kolenspoor.city

Project Team: Space Caviar: (Martina Muzi) in collaboration with Z33/Architectuurewijzer (Ciel Grommen).
Incomplete City: Joseph Grima, Dan Hill and Marco Ferrari.
Funded by the Flemish Government and Strategic Project Kolenspoor.
For a full list of participants: visit

For more information : www.kolenspoor.city

Exhibition:

30/09 2017 – 08/11/2017
ZLDRLUCHTFABRIEK
Belgium

Workshops:

14/03 2017
Houthalen-Hechteren
Genk

20/03 2017
Houthalen-Hechteren
Genk

22/03 2017
Other Market
Genk

26/03 2017
ZLDR Luchtfabriek
Zonhoven

27/03 2017
Evenementenhal
Zonhoven

02/04 2017
Luchtfabriek
Zolder

09/04 2017
Luchtfabriek
Zolder

18/04 2017
Primary school “Windekind”
Zonhoven

18/04 2017
Casino Beringen
Ravenshout

19/04 2017
Bike Ville Incubator
As

19/04 2017
Vrijetijdslocatie
As

20/04 2017
Vrijetijdslocatie
As

23/04 2017
ZLDR Luchtfabriek
Genk

24/04 2017
Other Market
Genk

29/04 2017
Neighbourhood centre Regina Mundi
Genk

08/05 2017
Other Market
Genk

01/06 2017- 01/09 2017
Tourist Office
As

Press:
Z33 House for Contemporary Art 9/2017
Z33 House for Contemporary Art 10/2017

Permalink
Player Piano: A Subjective Atlas of a Landscape of Labour
Abraxa1


“The future Homo Ludens will not have to make art for he shall be creative in the practice of his daily life.”

— Constant Nieuwenhuys

Player Piano is a revisitation of American writer Kurt Vonnegut’s 1952 debut novel. Set in a fully automated future, the book is a meditation on the meaning and purpose of life in a work-free environment in which labour has become the domain of machines.

Whereas Vonnegut’s text is a dark parable illustrating the crushing effects of mechanisation on human freedom and culture, this exhibition seeks to reframe the question of a post-labour society in historical terms. It prefigures a future (or maybe remembers a past) society that establishes itself on the island of Abraxa, the future site of Utopia—a landscape-as-collage built on millennia of mythologies, technological breakthroughs, societal conflict and class struggle.

The only thing more ancient than the dream of liberation from work is the dread of automation itself; yet stitching together fragments of this panorama of human endeavour another vision is possible – a civilization simultaneously liberated from the cults of labour, technology and ownership.

The current conditions of our existence are presented to us as inescapable— a political, economic and social order driven by imperatives of expansion and consumption to which, we are told, there is no viable alternative. Torn on a daily basis between the promise of technological salvation and the spectre of systemic collapse, we are led to make sense of an increasingly vast, complex and fragmented reality—in which the spectrum of what is possible to change has, paradoxically, been dramatically reduced.

Player Piano is a reflection on what is at stake as we set about the task of designing the future. Situating visitors in an undefined future landscape (an island, or perhaps the surface of a meteor), viewers are invited to recast themselves as tourists visiting a distant and unfamiliar reality in which ideas and technologies already visible on the horizon have dramatically expanded the boundaries of what is collectively considered possible.

Curator: Space Caviar (Joseph Grima, Simone Niquille, Giulia Finazzi, Sofia Pia Belenky, Jakob Skote, Nicci Yin)

Acoustic Design: Charli Tapp

Production: GISTO (Alessandro Mason, Gabriele Lucchitta)

Book Accompaniment: Notes for travellers to the island of Abraxa by Space Caviar
Appendix to:
Accelerer le Futur. Post-travail & Post-capitalisme : Nick Srnicek & Alex Williams

Exhibitions: 9 March- 9 April 2017
Biennale Internationale Design Saint-Étienne 2017
Cité du Design, Saint-Étienne, France

Subjects & Locations:

Hammer (Kenyathropus platyops, 3.3M BC), Lomekwi3 archeological dig, West Turkana, Kenya

Talos Urn (unknown, 5cBC) Ruvo di Puglia, Italy

Elephant Clock (Ismail Al Jazari, c.1206 AD, Iraq) reproduction in Ibn Battuta Mall, Dubai, c. 2005

Uro settlements (15c) Lake Titicaca, Peru

Knitting machine (William Lee, 1589) Calverton, Nottinghamshire, UK

The Admiralty building (Thomas Ripley, 1726) London, UK

Cromford Mills (Richard Arkwright, 1771) Derby, UK

Prosthetic leg (James Potts, c.1815) Chelsea, London UK

Statue of Joseph Marie Jacquard (1840) Lyon, France

Famine follies and roads (unknown, 1845 onwards) Western Ireland

Cragside Manor (Lord William Armstrong, 1863) Rothbury, Northumberland, UK

Dishwasher (Josephine Cochrane, 1887) Chicago, Illinois, USA

Credit Card (Edward Bellamy, 1887) Chicopee Falls, Massachusetts, USA

Remote Control Boat (Nikola Tesla, 1898) reproduction Nikola Tesla Museum, Belgrade, Serbia

Port Arthur Refinery (Texas Company, 1902) Port Arthur, Texas, USA

Motion Studies ( Frank & Lillian Gilbreth, 1908-1924) various locations, USA

Fordlandia (Henry Ford, 1928) Aveiro, Brazil

Hoover Dam (US Reclamation Service, 1931-36) Nevada/Arizona, USA

Rockefeller Center Lobby (Diego Rivera, 1934) New York, NY, USA

Shannon Free Zone (Brendan O’Regan, 1959) Shannon, Ireland

Carousel of Progress (Walt Disney, 1964) Buena Vista, Florida, USA

Post-it Note (Spencer Silver & Art Fry, Cynthiana, Kentucky, USA, 1974) New York, NY, USA

Vitra Test center (1989) Weil am Rhein, Germany

Trojan Room Coffee Machine (Computer Laboratory, University of Cambridge, 1991)

New York Stock Exchange Data Center (NYSE Euronext, 2010) Mahwah, New Jersey, USA

Ostrich Pillow (Studio Banana, 2012) Lausanne, Switzerland

Joylent, aka Jimmy Joy (Joey van Koningsbrugge, 2014) Amsterdam, The Netherlands

Proposed telecoms mast (Vigilant Global, 2016) Richborough, Kent, UK

After Tools (Leonardo Amicio, Federico Floriani, 2016) Milan, Italy

Mental Modems (Erik van der Veen, 2016) Rotterdam, The Netherlands

Fake News (Town of Veles, 2016) Macedonia

Leaf Cutter Ants (unknown) Brazil

Weekend (unknown) Central, Hong Kong

Permalink
SQM: Broelschool Demolition Workshop

dsl-9759

During Biennale Interieur 2014, the abandoned Broelschool in the centre of Kortrijk became the site of a site-specific intervention combining a physical dérive through the sprawling building with a timeline-based investigation of key events in the history of domestic architecture. For the duration of the Biennale, visitors had the last opportunity to explore the building before it is demolished to make way for the construction of apartments.This transition became an opportunity to critically examine the contemporary condition of domesticity. Space Caviar worked with ten artists, designers and architects from different countries to take part in the Broelschool Demolition Workshop throughout which participants collectively designed and built a path through the building, while creating a series of graphical and physical interventions on the architecture of the school. The work uncovered hidden aspects of the building and its history, interspersing them with fragments of text and data related to the history, politics and economics of domesticity. Using the building itself as a source of reusable material, the workshop became an opportunity to publicly reflect on architecture’s life-cycles and the shifts in the economies it embodies.


This project is a part of SQM: The Home Does Not Exist.


This project is a part of SQM: The Home Does Not Exist.

Project team: Tamar Shafrir, Joseph Grima, Martina Muzi
Organised in collaboration with: Folder (Marco Ferrari, Elisa Pasqual) and officinaGISTO (Alessandro Mason)
Broelschool Demolition Workshop participants: Simon Beckmann, Raphael Coutin, Vanessa Gerotto, Andrea Levorato, Marina Mangiat, Giulio Margheri, An Pan Thi Khanh, Roel Van Herpt, Joan Vellve, Leanne Wijnsma

The use of the Broelschool was made possible by Leopold de Keyser.Special thanks to: Pieter Blondé, Céline Lagae from Interieur 2014, Pieter Michiels from Buda Lab, Jan Boelen, Gaia Cambiaggi and Lorenza Baroncelli.

Save

Save

Permalink
FOMO
FOMO_Interface



FOMO is a print magazine generated with a custom made software which gathers social media interactions based on metadata filters by a specific hashtag and/or location. The collected data is arranged in a print-ready PDF according to a predefined design template, then printed, bound and distributed on the spot by the FOMObile, a collapsible mobile publishing platform.

Inspired by Bruce Sterling’s statement that “events are the new magazines”, FOMO is an attempt to produce a physical record of the fleeting bodies of physical interactions and electronic debris generated by event culture, while playing on the lurking “fear of missing out” (an inevitable byproduct of the experience economy). The platform records and makes accessible as a physical medium the electronic information nebula they produce.

The magazine’s production is a performative process that investigates the aesthetic and conceptual implications of the encounter between a centuries-old tradition of experimental publishing, the rising influence of machine intelligence in media, and the craving for instant gratification produced by real-time technologies. Variables such as background noise, number of people present, and intensity of social media activity inform the appearance of the final output, creating both moments of density and voids of activity. In Dadaist spirit, it is not so much an experiment in precision documentation as in finding alternative methods of representation and documentation of events.

FOMO is a print magazine generated with a custom made software which gathers social media interactions based on metadata filters by a specific hashtag and/or location. The collected data is arranged in a print-ready PDF according to a predefined design template, then printed, bound and distributed on the spot by the FOMObile, a collapsible mobile publishing platform.
Inspired by Bruce Sterling’s statement that “events are the new magazines”, FOMO is an attempt to produce a physical record of the fleeting bodies of physical interactions and electronic debris generated by event culture, while playing on the lurking “fear of missing out” (an inevitable byproduct of the experience economy). The platform records and makes accessible as a physical medium the electronic information nebula they produce.
Project team: Joseph Grima, Simone Niquille, Tamar Shafrir
Programming: Vinay Mehta
Milan Event Coordination: Tom Keeley

FOMObile Fabrication:Marcello Comoglio, Alessandro Mason

FOMO on Twitter @f_o_m_o
FOMO on Github here

Exhibition dates:
25/04 – 27/09 2015
What is Luxury? V&A Museum London

14/03 – 13/09 2015
Making Africa, Vitra Design Museum

07/10 2014
#Matera2019, Matera 2019 European Cultural Capital Bid

16 – 22/06 2014
JPEG (Joint Photographic Experts Group), Design Miami Basel

5 – 6/06 2014
Swiss Pavilion Marathon 
14th Venice Architecture Biennale

9 – 11/04 2014
#OnTheFlyMilan 
Salone del Mobile, Palazzo Clerici

Press:
Crafts Council UK
Dash Magazine
Post-Digital Publishing Archive

Design Miami Basel Design Log
Dezeen on Vimeo
What’s the point of a biennale? – Tom Dyckhoff
Dezeen
Vice Motherboard

Permalink
Neoasterisms
Globe4

Located in Lisbon’s main planetarium, Planetário Calouste Gulbenkian, Neoasterisms is a participatory project commissioned as part of experimentadesign 2013: No Borders. Neoasterisms examines the history of astronomical cartography as a site of cultural hegemony and a metaphor for histories of political decision-making, proposing a new map of the stars based on an open, participatory and culturally inclusive standard.

Neoasterisms invites participants from all over the world—either in person or via the web platform wikistars.org—to propose new constellations, submit their own mythologies, and revive lost astronomical traditions that were set aside when the global standard of celestial nomenclature was introduced by the International Astronomical Union in 1922. It is an attempt to question the largely Western-Eurocentric nature of contemporary astronomical standards.

Neoasterisms builds a framework for the collaborative inscription of the ideals, fears, and dreams of a new civilisation. If we started from scratch, if we looked at our starscape as a tabula rasa, what new constellations would we draw in 2013—in an era of borderless interaction, the simultaneous diversification and homogenisation of culture, and the proliferation of networks throughout society? What myths from distant cultures would we choose to revive as emblems of our own value system? Which artifacts or figures would we elevate to mythic status? What marginalised narratives would be unearthed? And how would we find resolution between independent voices in a process of global decision-making?

Neoasterisms invites participants from all over the world—either in person or via the web platform wikistars.org—to propose new constellations, submit their own mythologies, and revive lost astronomical traditions that were set aside when the global standard of celestial nomenclature was introduced by the International Astronomical Union in 1922. It is an attempt to question the largely Western-Eurocentric nature of contemporary astronomical standards.
Project team: Joseph Grima, Tamar Shafrir

Graphic design by Folder
Table fabrication by Alessandro Mason and Marcello Comoglio
Illustration by Giada Fiorindi
Website by Manuel Ehrenfeld
Video by Ben Landau

Exhibition dates:
9 November – 22 December 2013: experimentadesign 2013: No Borders, Planetário Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon
Permalink
Landgrab City
03F_LandGrab_e
Landgrab City is an installation commissioned by the Shenzhen & Hong Kong Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture and located on Shenzhenwan Avenue (Nanshan), a busy shopping district in the city of Shenzhen. Conceived as an experimental investigation into the full extent of Shenzhen’s spatial footprint, the installation is comprised of two parts: an map of one of the city’s dense downtown area, home to approximately 4.5 million people, and a plot of cultivated land divided into small lots. This land is a representation, at the same scale as the map, of the amount of territory necessary to provide the food consumed by the inhabitants of the portion of city sampled in the map, projected to 2027 (the year China is expected to overtake the US as the world’s leading economy). Each lot represents the extent of a single food group’s footprint: vegetables, cereals, fruit, pasture (for livestock), and so on. As China’s political and economic identity grows in range and complexity, increasing proportions of these territories of agricultural production have, in fact, migrated to far-flung regions of the planet, typically in Africa, Latin America, South-East Asia and Eastern Europe.

As is the case with many other regions of the world that urbanised rapidly in recent decades (such as the four Asian Tigers, the city-states in the Persian Gulf and even certain portions of northern Africa), one of the average threats to future stability and growth is perceived as the volatility in food prices on the international market. In response, agricultural land – as opposed to the food produced on that land – has itself become the target of acquisitions: wealthy nations are purchasing, more and more frequently, substantial tracts of agricultural territories in other (generally less wealthy) countries. More often than not, this phenomenon takes the form of a post-colonial land grab that enslaves vast agricultural territories of the planet to distant, wealthy urban enclaves.

The countryside is a vital but frequently overlooked category in the contemporary discourse around spatial policy, and its role with respect to the future of urbanism is more often than not neglected. Landgrab City is an attempt to visually represent the broader spatial identity of the 21st century metropolis; it proposes a new spatial definition of the city and thereby a more complex understanding of urbanism, one that no longer considers city limits as the boundary of its remit, but instead looks beyond – even across international borders – to the spatial, social, economic and political implications of the planet’s rapid urbanization.

Landgrab City is an installation commissioned by the Shenzhen & Hong Kong Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture and located on Shenzhenwan Avenue (Nanshan), a busy shopping district in the city of Shenzhen. Conceived as an experimental investigation into the full extent of Shenzhen’s spatial footprint, the installation is comprised of two parts: an map of one of the city’s dense downtown area, home to approximately 4.5 million people, and a plot of cultivated land divided into small lots.
By Joseph Grima, Jeffrey Johnson and José Esparza
Exhibition dates:
December 2009 – January 2010: Shenzhen & Hong Kong Bi-City Biennale of Urbanism\Architecture, Shenzhenwan Avenue, Nanshan
Permalink