SQM: Broelschool Demolition Workshop

dsl-9759

During Biennale Interieur 2014, the abandoned Broelschool in the centre of Kortrijk became the site of a site-specific intervention combining a physical dérive through the sprawling building with a timeline-based investigation of key events in the history of domestic architecture. For the duration of the Biennale, visitors had the last opportunity to explore the building before it is demolished to make way for the construction of apartments.This transition became an opportunity to critically examine the contemporary condition of domesticity. Space Caviar worked with ten artists, designers and architects from different countries to take part in the Broelschool Demolition Workshop throughout which participants collectively designed and built a path through the building, while creating a series of graphical and physical interventions on the architecture of the school. The work uncovered hidden aspects of the building and its history, interspersing them with fragments of text and data related to the history, politics and economics of domesticity. Using the building itself as a source of reusable material, the workshop became an opportunity to publicly reflect on architecture’s life-cycles and the shifts in the economies it embodies.


This project is a part of SQM: The Home Does Not Exist.


This project is a part of SQM: The Home Does Not Exist.

Project team: Tamar Shafrir, Joseph Grima, Martina Muzi
Organised in collaboration with: Folder (Marco Ferrari, Elisa Pasqual) and officinaGISTO (Alessandro Mason)
Broelschool Demolition Workshop participants: Simon Beckmann, Raphael Coutin, Vanessa Gerotto, Andrea Levorato, Marina Mangiat, Giulio Margheri, An Pan Thi Khanh, Roel Van Herpt, Joan Vellve, Leanne Wijnsma

The use of the Broelschool was made possible by Leopold de Keyser.Special thanks to: Pieter Blondé, Céline Lagae from Interieur 2014, Pieter Michiels from Buda Lab, Jan Boelen, Gaia Cambiaggi and Lorenza Baroncelli.

Save

Save

Permalink
Neoasterisms
Globe4

Located in Lisbon’s main planetarium, Planetário Calouste Gulbenkian, Neoasterisms is a participatory project commissioned as part of experimentadesign 2013: No Borders. Neoasterisms examines the history of astronomical cartography as a site of cultural hegemony and a metaphor for histories of political decision-making, proposing a new map of the stars based on an open, participatory and culturally inclusive standard.

Neoasterisms invites participants from all over the world—either in person or via the web platform wikistars.org—to propose new constellations, submit their own mythologies, and revive lost astronomical traditions that were set aside when the global standard of celestial nomenclature was introduced by the International Astronomical Union in 1922. It is an attempt to question the largely Western-Eurocentric nature of contemporary astronomical standards.

Neoasterisms builds a framework for the collaborative inscription of the ideals, fears, and dreams of a new civilisation. If we started from scratch, if we looked at our starscape as a tabula rasa, what new constellations would we draw in 2013—in an era of borderless interaction, the simultaneous diversification and homogenisation of culture, and the proliferation of networks throughout society? What myths from distant cultures would we choose to revive as emblems of our own value system? Which artifacts or figures would we elevate to mythic status? What marginalised narratives would be unearthed? And how would we find resolution between independent voices in a process of global decision-making?

Neoasterisms invites participants from all over the world—either in person or via the web platform wikistars.org—to propose new constellations, submit their own mythologies, and revive lost astronomical traditions that were set aside when the global standard of celestial nomenclature was introduced by the International Astronomical Union in 1922. It is an attempt to question the largely Western-Eurocentric nature of contemporary astronomical standards.
Project team: Joseph Grima, Tamar Shafrir

Graphic design by Folder
Table fabrication by Alessandro Mason and Marcello Comoglio
Illustration by Giada Fiorindi
Website by Manuel Ehrenfeld
Video by Ben Landau

Exhibition dates:
9 November – 22 December 2013: experimentadesign 2013: No Borders, Planetário Calouste Gulbenkian, Lisbon
Permalink
Project Heracles
big_352571_5704_Foto 31 fronte1




MEP Marisa Matias introduces Project Heracles at the European Parliament, Brussels; Lieven de Cauter, Dieter Lesage, and Joseph Grima in conversation at the opening of Project Heracles
Inspired by an email exchange dating back to 2002 between philosophers Lieven De Cauter and Dieter Lesage, Project Heracles is a commentary on the progressive closure and fortification of the European continent’s boundaries. The project, launched in May 2011 in Domus magazine and later presented as an micro-exhibition and debate in the European Parliament in Brussels, was an open call to architects, artists and designers to propose possible connections between the European and African continents across the Strait of Gibraltar in the form of postcards. The 200 imaginary works of infrastructure that were proposed suggested a wide range of possible answers to an ancient geopolitical dilemma: how to overcome—or at least reduce—the abyss that still separates Africa from Europe, despite the line of sight that unites the two shores across a 14 km stretch of water.

The 200 proposals received were exhibited in the Gopher Hole gallery in London in 2012 and subsequently in the central atrium of the European Parliament in Brussels in 2013. The exhibition was accompanied by an open letter to Herman Van Rompuy, President of the European Council.

Read the open letter

The project, launched in May 2011 in Domus magazine and later presented as an micro-exhibition and debate in the European Parliament in Brussels, was an open call to architects, artists and designers to propose possible connections between the European and African continents across the Strait of Gibraltar in the form of postcards. The 200 imaginary works of infrastructure that were proposed suggested a wide range of possible answers to an ancient geopolitical dilemma: how to overcome—or at least reduce—the abyss that still separates Africa from Europe, despite the line of sight that unites the two shores across a 14 km stretch of water.
Images:
Top: Postcard #143, Fabrizio Tozzoli and Eliana Salazar
Middle: Postcard #109, Life Crossing, Gianfranco Toso
Bottom: MEP Marisa Matias introduces Project Heracles at the European Parliament, Brussels
Exhibition dates:
17 – 20 December 2013: European Parliament Building, Brussels
12 April 2013: Afrofuture, la Rinascente, Milan
22 – 24 January 2012: DLD 2012, Munich
21 July – 4 August 2011: The Gopher Hole, London
Permalink